PLEASE CLICK to see the whole slide show. . . . . .
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In 2007, when Dr. Jim Conroy and Ms. Basia Alexander made their first trip to Colorado, the trees were weak. Weak trees attract insects. Many trees would go on to die from Pine Bark Beetles already feeding inside the trees.
In 2007, when Dr. Jim Conroy and Ms. Basia Alexander made their first trip to Colorado, the trees were weak.  Weak trees attract insects.  Many trees would go on to die from Pine Bark Beetles already feeding inside the trees.
Dr. Jim Conroy's research study is underway. This is the 2nd visit.
Dr. Jim Conroy
October 16, 2008, 3rd visit. In a sea of reddening trees which were already weak and "hit" by the beetle, some Lodgepole Pine trees remain green despite Pine Bark Beetle activity.
October 16, 2008, 3rd visit.  In a sea of reddening trees which were already weak and "hit" by the beetle, some Lodgepole Pine trees remain green despite Pine Bark Beetle activity.
June 2, 2009, 4th visit. Note the green needles and robust new growth "candles."
June 2, 2009, 4th visit.  Note the green needles and robust new growth "candles."
June 18. 2010, 6th visit. Test site acreage looks remarkably green. Healthier trees co-exist in balance with the Pine Bark Beetle, and stay green. In June of 2010, a few "silver ghosts" are still standing, but the majority of trees are green and have robust growth. Their healthier inner functions allow them to withstand the presence of a few beetle larvae feeding under the bark and still survive and thrive. The Lodgepole Pine trees and the Pine Bark Beetles can co-exist.
June 18. 2010, 6th visit.  Test site acreage looks remarkably green.  Healthier trees co-exist in balance with the Pine Bark Beetle, and stay green.  In June of 2010, a few "silver ghosts" are still standing, but the majority of trees are green and have robust growth.  Their healthier inner functions allow them to withstand the presence of a few beetle larvae feeding under the bark and still survive and thrive.  The Lodgepole Pine trees and the Pine Bark Beetles can co-exist.
2010. Other Nearby trees are brown.
2010.  Other Nearby trees are brown.
June 18. 2010, 6th visit. New growth is abundant despite the fact that some trees have beetle "hits."
June 18. 2010, 6th visit.  New growth is abundant despite the fact that some trees have beetle "hits."
Jun 24, 2011, 7th visit. Healthier trees continue to thrive. No new reddening has appeared.
Jun 24, 2011, 7th visit.  Healthier trees continue to thrive. No new reddening has appeared.
May 23, 2012, 8th visit. Another year and healthier trees continue to grow. The acreage is still remarkably green.
May 23, 2012, 8th visit.  Another year and healthier trees continue to grow.  The acreage is still remarkably green.
2012 Remaining trees are healthy after surviving 5 more years of beetle attack.
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September 16, 2012, 9th visit. The same scene is looking healthy and lush. The Lodgepole Pine Trees are co-existing with the Pine Bark Beetle. Trees are healthy enough not to succumb.
September 16, 2012, 9th visit. The Same scene looking healthy and lush.  The Lodgepole Pine Trees are co-existing with the Pine Bark Beetle.  Trees are healthy enough not to succumb.
June 12, 2013, 10th visit. A steady state has developed. The Pine Bark Beetle still lives in the area and still "hits" some weak trees. But, most Lodgepole Pine trees are healthy. Both organisms can co-exist, and even thrive, because dynamic balance has been rejuvenated in the ecosystem.
June 12, 2013, 10th visit. A steady state has developed.  The Pine Bark Beetle still lives in the area and still "hits" some weak trees.  But, most Lodgepole Pine trees are healthy.  Both organisms can co-exist, and even thrive, because dynamic balance has been rejuvenated in the ecosystem.
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June 26, 2009. This is why it's called the "Feeder Tree." A family of chickadees lives close the to bird feeder in the tree. Note the large "candles" of new growth.
June 26, 2009.  This is why it
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By the middle of June, 2010, growth candles are well developed, indicating improving inner health and better circulation.
By the middle of June, 2010, growth candles are well developed, indicating improving inner health and better circulation.
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Here is the June 12, 2013 photo of a lush and healthy Feeder Tree. There is a state of balance now on this property between the Lodgepole Pine trees and the Pine Bark Beetle. Even though the Beetle still lives in the area and even in these trees, they co-exist. The beetles do not reproduce wildly, the trees are healthy, and both can support each other.
Fraser Feeder June 12, 2013

Institute for Cooperative BioBalance® EcoSystem SUMMARY OF Research Study SITES for the Pine Bark Beetles and Lodgepole Pine Trees

There are 2 research sites in the Vail area and about 12 sites in the Winter Park/Fraser area.  (The numbers fluctuate because some people have moved.)

Dr. Jim Conroy and Ms. Basia Alexander were invited to try to help the Lodgepole Pine trees survive in the Winter Park/Fraser area of Colorado in late autumn of 2007.  The Pine Bark Beetle was being blamed for devastating entire mountainsides of trees.  However, the beetle and its accompanying blue stain fungus were only the agents of death.

In 2007, after nearly a decade of summer drought, warmer winters, and a policy of fire suppression, trees’ internal functionality was compromised and weak.  Dr. Conroy arrived to begin Tree Whispering®, Green Centrics™, and CoExistence Technologies® (this link sends you to sister website CooperativeBioBalance.org) bioenergy-based healing treatments.  Trees that were already weak and reddening at that time would die and become “silver ghosts.”  Trees that were green in 2008 continued to be at risk of being ‘hit’ when the beetles fly in summer, and then dying.

BioEnergy Treatments

Dr. Jim’s bioenergy-healing treatments strengthened the trees’ inner parts, functions, and systems. Early treatments focused on improving the trees’ compromised circulation systems and expanding the efficiency of cell division.

After wintering-over, in June of 2009, the treated trees showed little to no reddening.  Rather, they had green foliage and lush new growth  Dr. Jim’s bioenergy-healing work that spring would continue to strengthen the trees’ inner physiologies.

As the trees strengthen, they have less of risk of being “hit” multiple times or being killed by the feeding beetle larvae.  Healthier trees do not attract the beetle in the first place.  Healthier trees and the beetle can co-exist in the ecosystem.

 

What is an EcoPeace Treaty®?

  • Communicating intuitively and from the heart with two living Beings of Nature that are usually at odds with each other, as well as with the people responsible for the land.
  • Witnessing the agreement made by the two organisms about how they can live in dynamic balance.
  • The fundamental principle of EcoPeace Treaties is “Live and Let Live.”

Dr. Jim Conroy mediated an EcoPeace Treaty between Lodgepole Pine trees  and the Pine Bark Beetles in the Vail and Winter Park areas of Colorado.  His work there started in 2007 and continues today.

  • In the EcoPeace Treaty, the insects––which burrow under the bark––offered to move in small circles when they feed.  They  offered to not kill the tree; some offered to live in fallen logs that still had moisture.
  • In the EcoPeace Treaty, the Lodgepole Pine trees offered to support the life cycle of the insects after receiving Cooperative BioBalance® treatement from Dr. Jim Conroy.  The trees also offered to provide protection for the insects.
  • In the EcoPeace Treaty, the people responsible for the land agree not to use chemicals, not to cut down trees or kill the insects, and to respect the insects as living Beings.

Through the EcoPeace Treaty, both the Lodgepole Pine trees and the Pine Bark Beetles can co-exist in dynamic balance and flourish.  They support the people; the people support them.

Dr. Jim Conroy’s findings show that when living Beings such as insects are no longer threatened, they tend not to react defensively.  They no longer need to be aggressive or reproduce in extreme numbers.

 

Here is a summary of Pine Bark Beetle and Lodgepole Pine Tree activities on the sites.

Fraser Winter Park Aerial 920x

Acreage on Route 8, Fraser, CO

The photos in the slide show above are all from this acreage along Route 8 in Fraser, CO.  The same scene is shown year and after year with the trees thriving.

The “Feeder Tree” and “Scrape” at Moose Snort House, Fraser, CO

Photos in the slide show above detail the “Feeder Tree’s” progress.

“Scrape’s” photos and story will be added  soon.

“Beacon Tree” and “Champion” at Leslie’s, Fraser, CO

Coming soon:  Photos in the slide show above will detail  “Beacon’s” and “Chamption’s” progress through the years.

“Guardian” and the others at the railroad berm, Fraser, CO

Coming soon, more photos.

“Claw” and the others at Jill’s, Fraser, CO

Coming soon, more photos.

Jill is a dedicated steward of her land. Jill lost many trees to the beetle before Dr. Jim and Basia arrived in 2007.  And, over the years, strong winds have taken their toll by knocking down a few others.  But, overall, her trees are healthy and and show robust growth every year.  And, in 2012, birds and other wildlife are returning to Jill’s ecosystem.

“Harold Hill” and the others at Betsy’s, Fraser, CO

Coming soon, more photos.

“The Platoons” near the mountain top, Fraser, CO

Coming soon, more photos.

“Hummingbird Grove”, Winter Park, CO

Coming soon, more photos.

 

Vail Bing Map 920x

 

 

 

 

An Undisclosed Location, East Vail, CO

 

Coming soon, more photos.

An Undisclosed Location, West Vail, CO

Coming soon, more photos.