Please click to see the slide show. . . . . Read the entire story below about Ash Trees and Emerald Ash Borer. . . . . .
Please click to see the slide show. . . . . Read the entire story below about Ash Trees and Emerald Ash Borer. . . . . .
2015 Omega Institute site, 195 acres, has hundreds of Ash trees. No sign of the Ash Borer.
2015 duo Omega Ash Trees
2015 Red Hook, NY, research site.
Duo Rachel Ash 2015
The 85 acre Sharon, CT, Ash Tree and Emerald Ash Borer research study test site covers both sides of the road. The forest is at least 30% Ash trees. No sign of Ash Borer in 2015.
Please click to see the slide show. . . . . Read the entire story below. . . . . . The 85 acre Sharon, CT, Ash Tree and Emerald Ash Borer research study test site covers both sides of the road.  The forest is at least 30% Ash trees.
This is a 5 acre property in Alford, MA. The central field is lined with an abundance of Ash trees. The Emerald Ash Borer has not been found in the Alford Valley as of 2015.
This is a 5 acre property in Alford, MA.  The central field is lined with an abundance of Ash trees. The Emerald Ash Borer has not been found in the Alford Valley as of 2015.
In 2015, a sample of three Alford, MA, Ash trees shows good growth and health. These trees have received Cooperative BioBalance bioenergy-based treatment for at least 3 years.
In 2015, a sample of three Alford, MA, Ash trees shows good growth and health.  These trees have received Cooperative BioBalance bioenergy-based treatment for at least 3 years.
At the Alford, MA, site, notice on the left, the arrow marks one of the tallest Ash trees on the property. On the right side of this image, a very large Ash tree is in front of the driveway. In the center image, notice Dr. Jim standing at the base of the trees lining the central field.
At the Alford, MA, site, notice on the left, the arrow marks one of the tallest Ash trees on the property.  On the right side of this image, a very large Ash tree is in front of the driveway.  In the center image, notice Dr. Jim standing at the base of the trees lining the central field.
2015 Blairstown Ash site with healthy trees. No sign of the Ash Borer.
2015 Genesis Ash duo
2015. The Harding, New Jersey, site has a majestic Ash tree. No Ash Borer reported nearby.
Duo 2015 Andy Ash

Institute for Cooperative BioBalance® EcoSystem SUMMARY OF Research Study SITES

As of 2016, there have been no Emerald Ash Borers found on any of Dr. Jim Conroy’s research properties.  Please read all the way to the bottom for detail about each research site.  Please click through the slides above for a summary.

What is an EcoPeace Treaty®?

  • Communicating intuitively and from the heart with Living Beings.
  • Determining how two or more members of an ecosystem––possibly “invasives”––can live in dynamic balance.
  • Mediating an agreement between those Living Beings based on their needs, not human needs.

EcoPeace Treaty Structure

The structure of an EcoPeace Treaty is that of an up-side-down triangle. Two organisms that are usually at odds with each other come into dynamic balance during the mediation by the human facilitator. Responsible people on the property also work with the human facilitator in order to collaborate as respectful equals and offer their support into the agreement. There is not hard bargaining as everyone in the agreement willingly offers to do things that support the others.

 In an EcoPeace Treaty, the deep Intelligence within two organisms that are usually at odds with each other communicates with the facilitator. The organisms disclose what they need in order to survive and thrive. Then, with something like "generosity" they offer to support each other with a mutually beneficial arrangement. They offer to co-exist! Property owners or responsible people play a supportive role by respecting the life of both organisms.

In an EcoPeace Treaty, the deep Intelligence within two organisms that are usually at odds with each other communicates with the facilitator. The organisms disclose what they need in order to survive and thrive. Then, with something like “generosity” they offer to support each other with a mutually beneficial arrangement. They offer to co-exist! Property owners or responsible people play a supportive role by respecting the life of both organisms.

Dr. Jim Conroy began mediating an EcoPeace Treaty between Ash Trees and the Emerald Ash Borer in 2011.  Over the years, he has refined his technique.

Part of accomplishing an EcoPeace Treaty, includes helping the trees regain their health.  Dr. Jim Conroy does his hands-on bioenergy healing Cooperative BioBalance® treatments as part of the process. Dr. Jim does his work without any products; rather he works through his proprietary, hands-on, bioenergy healing systems called Cooperative BioBalance and EcoPeace Treaties.  By bringing the components of an ecosystem—plants, insects, organisms, the soil, the elements, and others––into healthy relationships, those components become interconnected and support each other. Thereby, a dynamically balanced whole ecosystem is formed and rejuvenated.

The EcoPeace Treaty between the Ash Trees and the Emerald Ash Borer mediated by Dr. Jim involved this mutual agreement:

  • The insects agreed to move in a small area under the bark so as to not disrupt the vascular system very much.  They also said that they would not kill most trees that they entered.
  • The Ash Trees, in turn, agreed to support the life cycle of the insect.  In order to do this, the trees must be healthy.  Therefore, helping weak trees regain their inner functionality and health is a crucial part of the EcoPeace Treaty.  Also, the trees agreed to provide protections to the insect.

When dynamic balance is re-established in an ecosystem, an invasive insect no longer has to react defensively.  Here’s an analogy:

If a band is playing a really good song and a new musician comes in, that new musician is likely to add harmony into that song.  That is dynamic balance.  However, if a bunch of musicians are sitting around, each playing their own tune and a new musician comes in, then there is no harmony to fit into.  The new musician might be considered “invasive.”  So it is in an ecosystem.  Dynamic balance in the whole ecosystem invites new members to fit into the harmony.  Dr. Conroy’s insight is that an insect species which is in dynamic balance no longer has to react aggressively or reproduce in extreme numbers.  “Live and Let Live” can prevail between the trees and the insects.

The Northeast United States of America is undergoing the movement of an invasive and non-native insect from west to east.  The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) arrived from Asia and was reported killing trees in the Great Lakes area in 2002.  The insect was officially found on the east side of the Hudson River in April of 2012.

Dr. Jim Conroy, Master BioBalancer®, says: “The new mindset for creating healthy and sustainable life on Earth will involve partnership with all living Beings and the adoption of the idea Live-And-Let-Live as a philosophy.  Cooperative BioBalance®,  coming from the plant’s point of view, and the introduction of the EcoPeace Treaty® technology are the keys to co-existing with invasive organisms, such as the Emerald Ash Borer, and solving ecosystem imbalances.”

The purpose of the Ash Tree and Emerald Ash Borer study is to show that the insects and the trees can co-exist through the use of Cooperative BioBalance® and EcoPeace Treaty® technologies.

(a) without the insects killing the trees and

(b) without people having to kill either one, by…

  • improving the bioenergetic interconnectivity of all living Beings in a defined ecosystem,
  • improving the health of Ash trees, specifically, in that defined ecosystem,
  • establishing a condition of dynamic balance in that ecosystem wherein all organisms support the WHOLE.  The WHOLE emergent ecosystem is greater than the sum of is parts.

Please click through the slide show above for photos and read the summaries below.

 

 

Summary of Emerald Ash Borer and Ash Tree activities on Each site with 2015 Updates.

Rhinebeck, New York

This property is close to the Hudson River and therefore close to many official Emerald Ash Borer locations.  However, none have been found as of 2015 on the property.

For lots of detail, please go to the Rhinebeck page and to EcoPeace Treaties Blog-Ash and Ash Borer Research.

Red Hook, New York

This Ash tree is along the road at one corner of the property.

The key Ash tree at the Red Hook property grows on the side of a pond. It is at the center of this photo. In 2015, it is very healthy and serving as the central beacon tree for the BioBalancing treatments and the EcoPeace Treaty with the Ash Borer.

The key Ash tree at the Red Hook property grows on the side of a pond. It is at the center of this photo.

This property is close to the Hudson river and therefore close to many official Emerald Ash Borer locations.  However, none have been found as of 2015 on the property.

In 2015, the Ash trees were very healthy. The key tree shown to the left served as the central beacon tree for Dr. Jim Conroy’s BioBalancing treatments and the EcoPeace Treaty with the Ash Borer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blairstown, New Jersey

Please go to this Blairstown page.

 

Sharon, Connecticut

This 85 acre hillside property in Sharon, CT, is covered heavily with Ash trees.  The landowners treasure their trees. In fact, they bought the property because it has a beautiful Chestnut tree in the yard near the house.  Chestnut trees are very rare.  They are making an organic haven on the land, complete with food gardens, fruit tree orchards, and other self-sufficient amenities.

This majestic Ash tree is right in front of the house.

This majestic Ash tree is right in front of the house.

IMG_4779 MIKE Meristem 2015

2015. The Ash tree right in front of the house is very healthy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These tall Ash trees line the road.

These tall Ash trees line the road.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lightening hit this enormous Ash tree living the middle of the forest.

Lightening hit this enormous Ash tree living the middle of the forest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alford, MA

This 5 acre property in Alford, Massachusetts, is lined with Ash trees.

The dots show only the Ash Trees that were positively identified. There are more in the forests around those edges.

The dots show only the Ash Trees that were positively identified. There are more in the forests around those edges.

2015. This Majestic Ash is at the entry to the property.

2015. This Majestic Ash is at the entry to the property.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the image, the “B” marking signifies a specific Ash tree that serves as a beacon (like a broadcast tower) for the holistic bioenergy treatment that Dr. Jim Conroy gives.  He needs to treat only a few trees — marked with “T” —  since trees operate in community.

 

Salisbury, CT

This 3 acre property in Salisbury, CT has numerous majestic Ash trees. The property owner has many Ash trees which were not healthy when we started the test in 2011. Unhealthy trees attract insects and diseases. Dr. Conroy’s first tasks was to improve the health of the Ash Trees in anticipation of the arrival of the non-native insect: the Emerald Ash Borer.

This homeowner wants to save her trees and avoid use of chemicals. Her Ash trees initially showed signs of weakened inner health.  Compromised inner functionality is an invitation to insect damage for trees in a similar way that stress in people invites the onset of a cold.  By improving the trees’ inner health, Dr. Conroy expects that they will be less attractive to any disease organism or insect, including the Emerald Ash Borer.

Summer of 2015. This is just one of the Ash trees on this property. It is healthy despite the dead branches. Those will eventually fall away or be pruned, leaving the healthy tree.

The property owner has many Ash trees which were not healthy when we started the test in 2011. Unhealthy trees attract insects and diseases. Dr. Jim’s plan is to use his hands-on bioenergy healing systems to improve the health of the Ash trees so that they are less susceptible to the Emerald Ash Borer.

 

 

 

 

Harding, NJ

The Harding, New Jersey research site was added in late 2014.  During 2015, the Emerald Ash Borer insect was NOT found in the area.

2014. The Harding site Ash has lost its leaves for winter.

2014. The Harding site Ash has lost its leaves for winter.

2015. The Harding site Ash is in full leaf in mid summer.

2015. The Harding site Ash is in full leaf in mid summer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

West Orange, NJ

Luckily, the Emerald Ash Borer has not been found in this area of New Jersey as of the end of 2015.  However, these homeowners are eager to have their trees become healthier with Cooperative BioBalancing and to have the EcoPeace Treaty in place.

Bio-energy treatments began in autumn of 2014 and continued throughout 2015.

IMG_3736 111214 IMG_4736

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mendham, New Jersey

This Mendham, New Jersey research site as added in late 2015.  The Ash trees’ leaves were already falling.

This Mendham, New Jersey, research site was added in autumn, 2015.

This Mendham, New Jersey, research site was added in autumn, 2015.

The Ash trees on the property were already shedding their leaves.

The Ash trees on the property were already shedding their leaves.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Morris Plains, New Jersey

This site was added in 2015.  No Emerald Ash Borer has been found near Morris Plains, NJ, in 2015.

2015. This Morris Plains, New Jersey, site was added in 2015.

2015. This Morris Plains, New Jersey, site was added in 2015.

 

Randolph, New Jersey

This Ash tree is the centerpiece of a large backyard in Randolph, New Jersey.  The site was added in 2015.

IMG_5892 Colton 101015

Park Ridge, IL

On August 6, 2014, Basia Alexander went to Chicago, Illinois, to visit her cousin, Dawn.  There, Basia realized that Dawn has an Ash tree in front of her home.  Since the Emerald Ash Borer arrived in the Great Lakes area in the 1990’s, it spread throughout the Illinois and Michigan areas first.  By the way, it arrived after the Ash trees were already weakened by Ash Yellows disease.

IMG_5540

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