May 1, 2013, Beginning of the EcoPeace Treaty research between deer, the demonstration gardens, and the people at Genesis EcoLiteracy Center. Please read the story below about how the research got started.
May 1, 2013, Beginning of the EcoPeace Treaty research between deer, the demonstration gardens, and the people at Genesis EcoLiteracy Center.  Please read the story below about how the research got started.
May 17, 2013, flags were placed as markers in the sloped garden.
May 17, 2013, flags were placed as markers in the sloped garden.
May 17, 2013, flags were placed as markers in the upper garden.
May 17, 2013, flags were placed as markers in the upper garden.
July 30, 2013. Abundant growth in the sloped garden shows that the deer are honoring the EcoPeace Treaty agreement.
July 30, 2013.  Abundant growth in the sloped garden shows that the deer are honoring the EcoPeace Treaty agreement.
July 30, 2013. The mature lettuce in the upper garden shows that the deer are honoring the EcoPeace Treaty agreement.
July 30, 2013.  The mature lettuce in the upper garden shows that the deer are honoring the EcoPeace Treaty agreement.
July 30, 2013. The mature kale in the sloped garden shows that the deer are honoring the EcoPeace Treaty agreement.
P1320957 kale
July 30, 2013. The cabbage is located at ground level in the handicapped demo garden. There is just a little nibbling seen--probably the work of the youngest deer.
July 30, 2013.  The cabbage is located at ground level in the handicapped demo garden.  There is just a little nibbling seen--probably the work of the youngest deer.
September 3, 2013. This small valley is surrounded by deep forest where the deer live. The sloped garden, handicapped garden and the orchard in the valley are shown for perspective.
September 3, 2013.  This small valley is surrounded by deep forest where the deer live.  The sloped garden, handicapped garden and the orchard in the valley are shown for perspective.
September 3, 2013. The upper garden is untouched.
September 3, 2013. The upper garden is untouched.
December 21, 2013. During a seasonal ceremony, participants tossed dried corn into the snow along existing deer paths. The token gesture was not meant to feed the deer on a regular basis, but rather to show the people's partnership with the deer in the EcoPeace Treaty.
December 21, 2013.  During a seasonal ceremony, participants tossed dried corn into the snow along existing deer paths.  The token gesture was not meant to feed the deer on a regular basis, but rather to show the people
April 26, 2014. 2nd Year of the EcoPeace Treaty begins. Marker flags are place in the valley. These are the sloped and handicapped gardens. It's easy to see the mowed area around the stream at the base of the valley. Also, please note how close the gardens are to the edge of the forest.
April 26, 2014.  2nd Year of the EcoPeace Treaty begins.  Marker flags are place in the valley.  These are the sloped and handicapped gardens. It
April 26, 2014. This view shows the whole valley. Forested areas where the deer live ring the valley. Note the tiered demonstration gardens, Across the wild area in the middle, note long raised rows where fruit trees will be planted. Marker flags dot the gardens and orchard.
April 26, 2014.  This view shows the whole valley. Forested areas where the deer live ring the valley.  Note the tiered demonstration gardens, Across the wild area in the middle, note long raised rows where fruit trees will be planted.  Marker flags dot the gardens and orchard.
July 11, 2014. During this year of the research, the Hosta around the house are included in the marked areas. This photo was taken in mid summer when the Hosta is blooming and it is untouched by the deer.
July 11, 2014.  During this year of the research, the Hosta around the house are included in the  marked areas.  This photo was taken in mid summer when the Hosta is blooming and it is untouched by the deer.
July 11, 2014. As the vegetables grow in July, note how close the forest's edge is. It would be easy for deer to walk over and eat the vegetables.
July 11, 2014.  As the vegetables grow in July, note how close the forest
October 10, 2014. One of the marker flags shows the Cooperative BioBalance and Tree Whispering logos. The plants in the garden look a little ragged in October but they have been untouched by deer.
October 10, 2014.  One of the marker flags shows the Cooperative BioBalance and Tree Whispering logos.  The plants in the garden look a little ragged in October but they have been untouched by deer.
October 10, 2014. Kale at the edge of the sloped garden is untouched by deer, but a few leaves have been harvested by people.
October 10, 2014.  Kale at the edge of the sloped garden is untouched by deer, but a few leaves have been harvested by people.
October 10, 2014. It's the end of the season and the Cabbage is fully grown. That shows that it has not been eaten by deer for the entire season. At the top of the photo, see the edge of the steam-bed area at the base of the valley. Deer have been seen browsing there and drinking in the stream.
October 10, 2014.  It
July 17, 2015. The EcoPeace Treaty is well underway by July of its 3rd year.
July 17, 2015.  The EcoPeace Treaty is well underway by July of its 3rd year.
August 27, 2015. The Hosta in front of the farmhouse was included in the EcoPeace Treaty in 2015. Note that it is untouched by the end of August.
P1030243 Hosta Genesis
September 12, 2015. This view of the handicapped demonstration garden shows lush and untouched growth. Note how close the forest's edge is where the deer live.
September 12, 2015.  This view of the handicapped demonstration garden shows lush and untouched growth.  Note how close the forest
September 12, 2015. Kale in the upper gardens is untouched.
IMG_5982 kale
September 29, 2015. Hosta in front of the farmhouse was included in the EcoPeace Treaty. By the end of September, it remains untouched by the deer. Note the inset photo. That is Hosta on the back side of the farmhouse that was NOT included in the EcoPeace Treaty; it did not have marker flags.
September 29, 2015.  Hosta in front of the farmhouse was included in the EcoPeace Treaty.  By the end of September, it remains untouched by the deer.  Note the inset photo.  That is Hosta on the back side of the farmhouse that was NOT included in the EcoPeace Treaty; it did not have marker flags.

Please click through the photos above for a summary of this EcoPeace Treaty.

Please read the story below in order to understand what EcoPeace Treaties are all about.

1st EcoPeace Treaty Research with a Mammal by Dr. Jim Conroy

The Director of an EcoLiteracy Center, farm, and community supported garden in New Jersey wanted to grow  demonstration garden close to the edge of the forest in a little valley. But she did not want to put up a fence in order to keep the deer from eating the vegetables and fruit. The Director wanted a different approach, more consistent with her values. She knew about my successful work with crop health at the community supported garden that is part of her property. In early 2013, she wondered aloud to me if I could help with her situation.

I had already done EcoPeace Treaties® for years with trees, plants, insects, micro-organisms, and others, but never with mammals. Still, I told her that I would give it a try.

Through my intuitive communications interface, I contacted Deer Spirit. I didn’t actually see any deer. Communicating with their spirit is similar to when a person is on a cell phone call. I didn’t know where the deer were. They didn’t know where I was. But, we “talked” on the “intuitive channel.” This way, Deer Spirit told me what the deer needed and wanted. It’s always a two-way dialog. I asked questions. The Intelligence or Spirit of Deer provided answers.

Deer and I worked out an EcoPeace Treaty to accomplish the director’s goal. The whole story is in our 2 books of the Live and Let Live series, Live and Let Live: How Multidimensional Collaboration Heals Ecosystems, and Live and Let Live: Enlightened Stewardship.

The underlying philosophies of the work are “Live and Let Live” and “Everyone is Connected.”  The basic  concept is inclusion of the deer, not exclusion.

In the first year, Spirit of Deer and I settled on an arrangement whereby I would mark off the areas that the people wanted them to avoid. They were willing to collaborate with humans and wanted a way to know where they were not supposed to go. They needed a marking system. Together, we decided on small utility flags.

I set about mediating the EcoPeace Treaty in collaboration with the deer, with the demonstration gardens and with the people.

Knowing what the deer needed to survive and to live set up the first corner of the triangular EcoPeace Treaty format. There was plenty for the deer to eat considering that the forest’s edge was close. There was a stream running through the property at the base of the little valley where the demonstration plots and orchard were located. So, the deer had water available. The Director stopped people from hunting on the property, therefore the deer had safety. And, with food, water, and safety, the deer had a good place to bear their young.

In the opposite corner, the vegetables of the demonstration gardens explained that they needed to grow to maturity, when I asked them.

The Director wanted intact demonstration gardens; not eaten by deer. She and her staff wanted to be able to harvest mature vegetables.

The Plant Kingdom as a whole Intelligence offered to make the EcoPeace Treaty possible. The trees and plants at the forest’s edge were willing to grow more greenery for the deer to eat, and gave their permission accordingly.

LLL-V2-EPT-DEER-Triangle

So, Deer Spirit agreed on behalf of the local deer families “saying” that they would avoid eating the vegetables in the demonstration gardens, avoid the leaves and fruit on the fruit trees, and avoid the Hosta plants in front of the farm house as long as they had forest-edge food available to them. And they wanted the areas to avoid to be well marked–hence the green utility flags.

Each year of the EcoPeace Treaty Research Study has shown improvement.  In the first year, a few young deer tested the boundaries by nibbling at the edges of the low growing vegetables.

I renewed the agreements each year.  I learned a lot about deer along the way so new things were integrated into the agreements.  Please read abaout those in our Live and Let Live series of books.

Generally, over the three years, the deer have kept their agreements. In 2015, full heads of cabbage remained intact as of October 10th, attaining their need to grow to maturity.  The deer ate the grasses nearby but not the cabbages.

The Director and her staff have continued to respect and honor the deer on the property. Often they give tokens of corn kernals or blueberry pancakes to the deer during seasonal ceremonies.

Most importantly, the plants and trees at the forest’s edge were lush and green throughout the summer and into the autumn so that the deer would have as much food as possible.

By the way, there is no magic in the flags.

The flags are simply mutually agreed-upon markers within the scope of the EcoPeace Treaty. The flags by themselves do not keep the deer away. It’s the communication and collaboration among all parties in the framework of the EcoPeace Treaty that gets the results that everyone wants.

The EcoPeace Treaty was started in early 2013 and research continues.